Blue Bird

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Contents

Home Page
Foreword
Baltimore Oriole
Barn Swallow
Chickadee
Blue Bird
Blue Jay
Bobwhite
Brown Creeper
Brown Thrasher
Canada Goose
Cardinal
Catbird
Cedar Waxwing
Chimney Swift
Chipping Sparrow
Cowbird
Crow
Downy Woodpecker
Flicker
Goldfinch
Grackle
Green Heron
Herring Gull
House Sparrow
House Wren
Junco
Killdeer
Mallard
Mockingbird
Mourning Dove
Myrtle Warbler
Nighthawk
Pigeon
Purple Martin
Red-eyed Vireo
Red-headed WP
Red-winged BB
Robin
Hummingbird
Song Sparrow
Sparrow Hawk
Starling
Towhee
Tufted Titmouse
Turkey Vulture
White-breasted Nuthatch
White-crowned Sparrow
Wood Pewee
Wood Thrush
Yellowthroat
Yellow Warbler
Magic Cards

Bluebird (Sialia sp.)

Bluebird

About 6 inches long, bluebirds breed in the United States, southern Canada, Mexico, and Guatemala, wintering in the southern half of the Eastern United States and south to Guatemala.

The bluebird was once a familiar tenant of towns, hailed as the herald of a new vernal season, and decidedly domestic in its habits. About the time that starlings became so very numerous, it declined in numbers. No one is sure why its numbers fell, but competition for nest sites by starlings and house sparrows is certainly partly responsible. Recently, it has begun to reappear in many places.

Its favorite nesting sites are natural cavities in old trees, boxes made for its use or crannies in buildings. Nesting boxes may be restoring the species, whose occupants pay rent by destroying insects. The bluebird’s diet consists of 68 percent insects and 32 percent vegetable matter. The commonest items of insect food are grasshoppers first and beetles next, while caterpillars stand third. Small flocks sometime invade yards for the red fruits of flowering dogwood trees.


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