Foreword

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Contents

Home Page
Foreword
Baltimore Oriole
Barn Swallow
Chickadee
Blue Bird
Blue Jay
Bobwhite
Brown Creeper
Brown Thrasher
Canada Goose
Cardinal
Catbird
Cedar Waxwing
Chimney Swift
Chipping Sparrow
Cowbird
Crow
Downy Woodpecker
Flicker
Goldfinch
Grackle
Green Heron
Herring Gull
House Sparrow
House Wren
Junco
Killdeer
Mallard
Mockingbird
Mourning Dove
Myrtle Warbler
Nighthawk
Pigeon
Purple Martin
Red-eyed Vireo
Red-headed WP
Red-winged BB
Robin
Hummingbird
Song Sparrow
Sparrow Hawk
Starling
Towhee
Tufted Titmouse
Turkey Vulture
White-breasted Nuthatch
White-crowned Sparrow
Wood Pewee
Wood Thrush
Yellowthroat
Yellow Warbler
Magic Cards
Final Exam

The following is the actual Foreword to Fifty Birds of Town and City.

When the forerunner of this little book first was published in the early years of this century, it was entitled "Fifty Common Birds of Farm and Orchard" and featured paintings by Louis Agassiz Fuertes.  "Fifty Birds of Town and City" was issued almost 20 years ago, and it carried forth in the tradition of the earlier work, but reflected the changes this nation had undergone in more than half a century, especially the shift from a rural to an urban people.

Throughout the 1980's, birdwatching (or perhaps bird appreciation) has grown phenomenally in our society.  Tens of millions of Americans have found birdwatching to be, quite literally in many instances, their window to the natural world.   Data gathered by the Fish and Wildlife Service indicates that over 60 million Americans watch birds as a pastime; and some 5 million are avid birders.  Our surveys show also another clear trend: not only are more Americans watching Birds, more are feeding them on a regular basis, and more than ever before are buying or building homes for birds to nest.

The birds depicted in this book are valuable reminders.  We need them; we need the same clean and wholesome environment upon which they rely; we must work to ensure their continued well-being (and that of other migratory and non-hunted species) so that our own future can be assured.

This edition of "Fifty Birds of Town and City" continues to feature the artwork of Bob Hines, who for 34 years was the Fish and Wildlife Service's national wildlife artist.  In the span of his career with this agency, Bob's gifted palette yielded countless images of creatures grand and small, but these works were among his favorites.  And it is easy to see why.  Bob's birds capture moments of cautious quiet, as well as the joys of flight.  Through his eyes and his brush, we see anew why the natural world is needed, and we gather a brief glimpse of how the world of feathers, color, and flight can sustain us, in body and in spirit.

Frank Dunkle,
Director,
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service