Mockingbird

Previous Page Home Page Next Page

 

Contents

Home Page
Foreword
Baltimore Oriole
Barn Swallow
Chickadee
Blue Bird
Blue Jay
Bobwhite
Brown Creeper
Brown Thrasher
Canada Goose
Cardinal
Catbird
Cedar Waxwing
Chimney Swift
Chipping Sparrow
Cowbird
Crow
Downy Woodpecker
Flicker
Goldfinch
Grackle
Green Heron
Herring Gull
House Sparrow
House Wren
Junco
Killdeer
Mallard
Mockingbird
Mourning Dove
Myrtle Warbler
Nighthawk
Pigeon
Purple Martin
Red-eyed Vireo
Red-headed WP
Red-winged BB
Robin
Hummingbird
Song Sparrow
Sparrow Hawk
Starling
Towhee
Tufted Titmouse
Turkey Vulture
White-breasted Nuthatch
White-crowned Sparrow
Wood Pewee
Wood Thrush
Yellowthroat
Yellow Warbler
Magic Cards

Mockingbird (Mimus polyglottos)

Mockingbird

Ten inches long and neatly but soberly feathered, this was the bird of the Old South, but it is resident now from southern Mexico north to Michigan, Maine, even up to Wyoming, and seems to be spreading farther.

Because of its incomparable medleys and ability to mimic other birds, whistles, clocks, and bells, the mockingbird is the most renowned singer of the Western Hemisphere.   Even in confinement it is a masterly performer, and in the nineteenth century, many were trapped and sold for cage birds.  This practice ceased long ago, under law and close scrutiny.  Mockers will feed on cultivated fruits, but they have so won human affection that this is rarely charged against them--principally because of that reputation as a songster and the fact that they eat a variety of destructive insects.

Raisins, oranges, or apples will bring them to a feeding station.  To prevent them driving all other birds away from your tray, it helps to put the mocker's rations at a distance, preferably across the yard, or on the opposite side of the house.


Bird Lover's Paradise Visit our Yankee Gardener Bird Lover's Paradise for a comprehensive section of bird houses, feeders, bird books and resources.