Starling

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Magic Cards

Starling (Sturnus vulgaris)

Starling

There are few people in the United States who have not seen starlings, even though the viewers might not know the label.  Introduced into this country in the 1880's, they took hold rapidly and became permanent residents everywhere in the Nation, plus southern Canada and northern Mexico.  They live in city parks and crevices of buildings, using large communal roosts in winter; you can hear the tribe gathering on cold nights along the face of many a downtown office building.

Frequently characterized as pests, they are certainly abundant.  Their own call is a jittery squeak, but they imitate many birds, and sunlight brings out a shimmer of colors in their plumage.  They eat almost anything, but that includes a lot of insects like Japanese beetles.  Don't scoff at starlings; they're aggressive, quarrelsome, and determined, and they are surely here to stay.


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